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2nd Lieutenant, 5th Battalion Royal Welch Fusiliers.

Died of wounds 30th October 1918.

Buried at Longendale (Mottram-in-Longendale) Cemetery, UK.

Unknown relationship to The Tech.


Harold was born at Broadbottom, near Hyde on 27th March 1894. He was the youngest son of Mrs. Eliza Beard. He was educated at the Hyde and Manchester Technical Schools, and Salford Royal Technical Institute, later studying in the architectural and engineering profession whilst employed as a draughtsman in the Textile Drawing Office at Mather and Platt Ltd, Newton Heath. A well-known, gifted and pleasing musician, he played the violin with great skill and feeling as a member of the Hyde Philharmonic Society, and the Uppermill and Greenfield Philharmonic Society. With his brother Frank they were active members of the Union Street Sunday School and Chapel and Poor Children’s Mission.

Harold enlisted on 3rd February 1915. After training in North Wales and Whinlatter, he went out to France and saw much of the early fighting around Frostert, St Venant, Givenchy, Richburg, and Neuve Chapelle, in which he showed unfailing courage and devotion to duty. On the recommendation of his commanding officer he was awarded a commission on the field, and was sent to England for a special course of instruction.

During the the Somme offensive of 1916, Harold’s battalion was involved in attacks on Frostert, and the gruesome captures of Mametz and Mometz Wood, Trones Wood and High Wood. After having three months’ continued action on the front, the battalion went back for reorganisation, and moved up to the Ypres Salient.

On 3rd September 1916 whilst holding a section of the line during a heavy bombardment, Harold was seriously wounded in the head, back, right arm, shoulder and thigh after being crushed by the parapet falling in on him. He received medical treatment then he returned to duty on 31st September 1916, applied for a commission in December 1916 and was awarded it in June 1917. He received a wound gratuity on 9th November 1917. A relapse occurred and Harold was treated in London hospitals until June 1918 when he returned home. Sadly he was not to fully recover and died a few months later. He was given a full military funeral and buried in the family grave at Mottram which is inscribed: “They gave their glorious youth.”

His brother Frank, a corporal with the 3rd Cheshire who was reported missing near Reninghelst, Belgium on 26th April 1918, also lost his life in the war.