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Captain, 7th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps., Military Cross.

Died of wounds 12th April 1917, age 27.

Buried in Warlincourt Halte British Cemetery, France.

Unknown relationship to the University (not located in Tech registers).


 

George Hamilton Williamson was born on 19th September 1889 at Fallowfield, Manchester to John Harper, a chartered accounttant, and Margaret Clark Williamson. He was educated ar Park Hurst School, Buxton and King William’s College on the Isle of Man where he was a keen athlete and footballer. He later went to Edinburgh University (1907-11) to study classics and then to Cambridge before becoming a master at Bilton Grange College near Rugby. In September 1913 he moved to Oundle School, Lincolnshire where he was also the rugby coach. He also enjoyed playing hockey and cricket.

George had been a member of the Officer Training Corps while in Edinburgh, joined the Terrotorials in December 1913 and was a member of Oundle School Officer Training Corps. He was gazetted as a 2nd Lieutenant with the King’s Royal Rifle Corps in December 1914. In 1915 he was wounded serving at Ypres and invalided back to England to recover. He was promoted to Captain in May 1916. In June 1916 George was Mentioned in Despatches and for his actiona at Delville Wood on the Somme later that year he was awarded the military cross: “For conspicuous gallantry during operations. He led his platoon to assist in the consolidation, took command of a company which had lost its officers, and by his coolness and energy enabled the position to be secured.” Injured again he was sent home, but returned to the trenches in February 1917. George was wounded on 11th April 1917 for a third time while leading his men in an advance during a heavy snow shower at Wancourt during the Battle of Arras. He died the next day at No. 20 Casualty Clearing Station. His commanding officer said “He was the finest company commander that I had, and I had recommended him as an officer fitting to command a battalion, for his work with the company was always so good and thorough”. Other affectionately referred to him as ‘Uncle’ and and noted that “he had perhaps a larger share n the fortunes of the battalion than any other one officer. He was undoubtedly one of the best men the regiment can ever have had. His bravery on all occasions was really remarkable, and had more to do with our success on several occasions than anything else”. Another recalled that “The men loved as well as erspected him, and to get the respect of the men is a big things, but to gain their real affection as well, is to my mind the true test of the ideal soldier”.

George left £349 of effects to his father. Just a week after George’s death his brother 2nd Lieutenant Kenneth Harper Williamson, serving in the same regiment, also died.