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Lieutenant, 6th Battalion Durham Light Infantry.

Killed in action 21st March 1916.

Buried at Moshi Cemetery, Tanzania.

Former student of engineering.

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Arthur was born in Lower Bebington, Cheshire, in 1892 to Frederick and Emily. The Goodall family moved to South Africa shortly afterwards and Arthur completing his secondary education at Bishop’s College, Capetown, passing matriculation at the Cape of Good Horn University before accepting a place at Manchester University to study Engineering. Entering Hulme Hall in October 1910, Arthur enjoyed student life and took an active part in student affairs and was a popular member of the Men’s Union. Playing rugby for the University, he was a regular in the Second XV and won Athletic Colours at Hulme Hall for his contribution to the tug-of-war and swimming teams. He was also a member of the Officer Training Corp, attaining the rank of Lance Corporal. Arthur did not pass the first two years of his degree and in July 1913 he left Manchester and returned to Durban, South Africa, where he had accepted an Engineering position with Lever Brothers. In January 1914, Arthur applied for, and received, a commission with the Durban Light Infantry.

At the outbreak of War, the South African government declared their support for the Allies. This was despite internal opposition from many Afrikaans who were against fighting alongside the British so soon after the Second Boer War which had ended 12 years earlier. Germany had colonised two large areas of Africa in the 1880’s, creating German South-West Africa and German East Africa. After a failed attempt to invade German South-West Africa in 1914, the German’s launched their own pre-emptive attack on South Africa in February 1915. Two Battalions of the Durban Light Infantry were involved in the resulting invasion that followed the defeat of the German and Afrikaans Army during the Battle of Kakamas. It hasn’t been determined which Battalion Arthur fought with: The 1st Battalion were involved in fighting to the north of South-West Africa, whilst the 2nd Battalion were responsible for maintaining lines of communication..

After returning to South Africa following the successful defeat of the enemy by July 1915, Arthur and a large number of his comrades volunteered to continue fighting against the Germans in German East Africa, forming the core of the 6th African Infantry Regiment (AIR). In March 1916, the British launched an attack through the Taveta Gap from British East Africa into German East Africa, capturing the nearby town of Moshi, near Mount Kilimanjaro. The 6th AIB formed part of the 2nd South African Infantry Brigade (SAIB) who followed in reserve. On 21 March 1916, Lieutenant Arthur Goodall found himself attacking heavily defended German trenches along the line of the Soko River with the 2nd SAIB. Facing fierce resistance, the South African Infantry were forced back. During the attack, Arthur went to the aid of his Sergeant who had been badly wounded. Whilst bandaging the wounds, Arthur was hit and killed. Arthur is now buried in Moshi, Tanzania, in the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro.

Arthur possessed the gift of friendship in a marked degree, and was very popular in the Hall and at the University. He was a familiar figure, in cowboy costume, at the Shrove Tuesday celebrations, and entered into all University activities with enthusiasm. In him the Hall loses one of its stalwarts.