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Lieutenant, 6th Battalion Manchester Regiment.

Killed in Action Friday 4th June 1915, age 27.

Remembered on Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Former student of engineering.

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Arthur was born on the 15th March 1888 at Bakewall, Derbyshire. He was the second son of Colonel Herbert Brooke Taylor, Honorary Secretary of the local Red Cross and Ambulance Society and President of the Bakewell Farmers’ Club, and his wife Mary Taitt. Arthur was educated locally at Lady Manners’ School and then Cheltenham College. He was intending to join the navy, but with a keen interest in engineering he opted to attend Manchester University and obtained a Certificate of Engineering in 1909. After his studies Arthur was employed by Saunders & Taylor Ltd. where he trained in the design and erection of heating installations for public buildings. He was an associate member of the Institute of Civil Engineers, enjoyed golf, football and hockey and was an active officer of the Knutsford Church Lads’ Brigade.

Arthur was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 2nd Volunteer Battalion of the Sherwood Foresters in 1905, passing the Hythe Musketry Course with distinction. He was promoted to Lieutenant in 1907 and became commander of the machine gun section. He demonstrated that machine guns were going to be a useful weapon and also adapted them for mountain warfare while training in the Derbyshire hills. The formation of the Territorial Force included a reduction in infantry numbers and Arthur reverted to the rank of 2nd Lieutenant with the 6th Battalion Sherwood Foresters. In late 1913 he transferred to the 6th Battalion Manchester Regiment as a Lieutenant where he was a musketry instructor whose methods were admired and much appreciated by his colonel.

Arthur died while storming a Turkish position during the Third Battle of Krithia. The commanding officer wrote to Arthur’s parents: “Your son was killed in the charge in front of the Turkish trenches, but owing to one portion of the ground being subsequently lost we were unable to get him. He died, as we know, fighting bravely with his Platoon around him, and it was due to his fine leading, as with others of our officers, that so much progress was made. He was a very keen, capable officer, and we were all very find of him. The poor Regiment was terribly depleted in officers and men”. The adjutant recalled: “No officer ever did his duty more whole-heartedly than your son, or more completely possessed the affection and confidence of his men. We hope one day we may be able to erect a memorial to all our officers who were killed within the same area, and already have a spot for it. I am sure that he died quite happy; he was full of drive and dash and did not know what fear was. We miss him and the others every day… Brooke Taylor did the work of four men. His energy and fearlessness were an example to any one. Poor old Brooke, he was a topper, and he died one, too. He was killed instantly, riddled with bullets by a machine gun, with his men around him.”

Arthur’s uncle, not serving in the armed forces, died the same weekend that the family received news of Arthur’s loss, a terrible blow to his father especially as the previous year one of his daughter’s had died suddenly. Further bad news was forthcoming in June 1915 when one of Arthur’s brothers Lieutenant Edward Mallalieu Taylor was reported as wounded. Edward and another brother, Captain C. Taylor, both appear to have survived the war.

He left effects worth £902 5s. 8d. to his father.