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Lieutenant, 1st/7th Battalion Manchester Regiment.

Killed in action on Friday 4th June 1915, age 24.

Remembered on Helles Memorial, Turkey.

Former student of science.

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Harold was born on 27th July 1890. He was the only son of Alderman James Herbert, Ex-Lord Mayor of Manchester, and Isabella Thewlis. Harold was educated at Woodlands School, Fallowfield and Manchester Grammar School. While at the latter he won the Langworthy science prize and was a prefect. He entered the University of Manchester in 1909 and obtained a B.Sc. in 1914. He was at Holmes Chapel Agricultural College with a view to taking up research work when war broke out.

Harold was a member of the University Officer Training Corps (O.T.C.) from October 1909 to September 1912 being commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the 1st/7th Manchester Regiment in November 1912. Promoted in September 1914 he proceeded with his battalion to Khartoum where he was second in command of the Camel Company of the Soudan. In letters home he described life in Egypt as full of interest and when he found himself in the Gallipoli trenches considered the discomforts to be something that had to be endured without complaint. He was killed while leading an advance during the Third Battle of Krithia, and when it was suggested that perhaps he should fall back he reputedly said “I was told to hold this position and am I going to do it. Retire! Certainly not!”. A Manchester Grammar School Old Master who was wounded in the same attack wrote to Harold’s parents “Your son’s company had an exceptionally dangerous section to attack up a ravine, but they stuck to it wonderfully, and it was whilst he was right in front leading them on and directing them that he was shot down. He fell as he would wish to have done, leading his men in the position of greatest danger. He was most popular amongst his men and brother officers, and I am asked to convey to you the sincere sympathy of us all”.

A memorial service was held at Rusholme Road Chapel, Manchester, on 27th June 1915. It was attended by 120 officers and men, including the O.T.C. Commander Major Sir Thomas Holland. The bugles and drums of the 3/7th Battalion from Burlington Street headquarters played. Many friends and associates of the family were present. After a sermon and hymns the last post was sounded.

Harold’s will left £181 16s. 10d. to his father who was listed an an umbrella manufacturer.