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Captain,  4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers.

Died of wounds on Sunday 23rd August 1914 at Mons, age 34.

Buried at St. Symphorien Military Cemetery, Belgium.

Adjutant to the University of Manchester Officer Training Corps.

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Shortly before the outbreak of war Captain Forster was appointed as Adjutant of the University of Manchester Officer Training Corps. In the University Senate Minutes of 5th November 1914 the Vice Chancellor reported: ‘that there seems little doubt that Captain F A Forster, adjutant to the Contingent, who was reported missing has been killed’. Captain Forster was part of “Y” (or ” C “) Company, commanding two platoons at Nimy Bridge near Mons and it was while defending that bridge that he was wounded and died. The Bond of Sacrifice provides the following biography:

“Captain Frederick Forster, 4th Battn. The Royal Fusilier, (City of London Regiment), was the second son if the late Paul Forster, of Malverley’s, East Woodhay, Hants, was born on the 24th December, 1879, and educated at Eton, and Trinity College, Cambridge.

He joined the Royal Fusiliers in May, 1900, becoming Lieutenant in April 1902. He was employed with the West African Frontier Force from April, 1904, to January, 1907, during which time he saw active service in Northern Nigeria in 1906, receiving the medal with clasp.

He was promoted Captain in April 1909, and in October, 1910, was appointed Adjutant of the 1st Battalion, an appointment he held until September, 1913. In April, 1914, he was appointed Adjutant (attending General Staff) of the O.T.C.’s of the Universities of Leeds, Manchester, Sheffield, and Nottingham.

On the outbreak of the war Captain Forster was ordered to join the 4th Battalion of his regiment at Newport, Isle of Wight, and proceeded with it to France on 13th August 1914.

At the beginning of the year 1915 it was stated in the casualty lists that Captain Forster has been “unofficially reported killed or died of wounds,” but it has since been ascertained that he died on the 23rd August, 1914, two hours after he was wounded. He was wounded three times while defending a bridge on the canal at Nimy, a suburb or Mons, and was buried on the battlefield.

His recreations were hunting and shooting, and he was a member of the United Service Club, London, and of the Kildare Street Club, Dublin.”